The art of the candid wedding photo


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There’s a wonderful saying in the creative arts that you learn more in a day on the job than you ever could in a classroom.

And it’s a sentiment that rings true for Melbourne photographer Damian Vincenzi  who says he’s been storytelling with images for as long as he can remember, first steered his career towards weddings when he was at photographic college.

Here are his five tips for places to snap a candid wedding photo:

 

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Here’s five great places for candid and informal photos….

The dance floor

The first dance is always a beautiful moment, but that’s not where the fun ends. The combination of kitsch favourites, uninhibited relatives and a glass of champagne or three almost begs to be captured on film. .

Speeches

Whether it’s a polished public speaker who has something moving and insightful to say, or a best man with a talent for comedy, it’s often the reaction shots that are the most priceless.

Back of the ceremony

The focus, of course, is always up the front on the couple who are vowing to have and to hold, plus their immediate family. But if you focus back a few rows, you’ll often find people who are good friends with both the bride and the groom, and their faces and reactions will be a beautiful testament to the joy of the day.

Under the tables

You mightn’t expect it, but the space beneath the tables can be a hotbed of activity, from tiny flowergirls curled up for a nap to feet slipping thankfully out of skyscraper heels. Images from below also work really well as something different for the wedding party, whether you capture their feet hanging over the side of a bench, a pontoon or even a fence.

Staircases or hallways

Because these are high-traffic areas, you’ll often find this is where people stop to have a catch-up, a laugh or a chat. Where better to capture two cousins who haven’t seen each in a decade, or two single guests enjoying a moment of flirtation?

Damian says weddings in general lend themselves beautifully to shots across all generations, from the newest arrivals to senior members of the family who can look around proudly at the families they’ve created.

And he says the best moments are often the unplanned ones.

“My favourite moments tend to be the ones you don’t expect; the ones that make people laugh,” he says. “It might be a speech that someone got wrong and everyone has a chuckle or someone forgetting the rings. Usually, it’s the things that aren’t scripted.”

But for moments that are planned – and more – he has a key piece of advice he gives to his couples as he plans their personalised coverage.

“I try to let them know this: ‘You’ve done all the organising. You’ve spent months and months and months making it perfect, so knows it’s time to let go, to enjoy what you’ve created and to trust me.

“I’ve got it from here.”

 

 


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Comments 1 comment

One response to “The art of the candid wedding photo”

  1. Fantastic! Great ideas for them unexpected priceless photos.

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